Dates Announced for New York City's Summer Restaurant Week

 

It's back! It's back! New York City's Restaurant Month Week will return this summer in what may be the longest week ever: more than 20 days of dining deals from July 22 to August 16, Mondays through Fridays. (Saturdays are excluded and Sundays are optional.) Guests can try three-course prix-fixe lunches for $25 and three-course prix-fixe dinners for $38 (excluding beverages, gratuities and taxes). Diners can begin to make reservations at more than 300 participating restaurants starting July 8 at nycgo.com/restaurantweek.  

“NYC Restaurant Week offers visitors and New Yorkers the perfect opportunity to try a new cuisine and sample the various offerings of New York City’s finest dining establishments at an affordable price,” said NYC & Company CEO George Fertitta. “Programs like NYC Restaurant Week showcase the vibrancy and diversity of New York City and help spotlight and support one of the City’s most important industries.” 

NYC Restaurant Week, the first and largest dining program of its kind, was created in 1992 for the Democratic National Convention in New York City. Good to know: New York City offers more dining options than most states do, boasting 24,000 restaurants and food service establishments. According to OpenTable, approximately 210,000 diners were seated though online reservations during the Winter 2013 promotion, generating over $6 million to participating restaurants. In addition, reservations via mobile device increased by 65 percent over the Winter 2012 promotion.

 A full list of the summer participants will be available when reservations open on July 8 at nycgo.com/restaurantweek.   

 

Suggested Articles

The new collection is made up of 110 itineraries, 97 of them brand new, 70 overnights and 15 new ports to explore. Learn more here.

Maui may prohibit activities like surfing lessons, scuba tours and snorkeling and kite boarding instruction on Sundays and holidays. Learn more here.

For your next trip to Europe, consider skipping the big museum and instead head to one of these houses that offer a true look at another time period.