New Historic Suites at Café Royal London

Hyde Park Winter Wonderland, London
Hyde Park Winter Wonderland, London // Photo by gianliguori/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Cafe Royal LondonOne of the hottest new hotels in the British capital, Café Royal London has been the talk of the town since it opened in December 2012. (The four-year renovation project utterly transformed what was once a famous rendez-vous spot for celebrities, transforming it into a luxury hotel.) Now the Café Royal has improved on perfection by unveiling six historic suites, each inspired by original details (like classical gilding in the Empire Suite and 16th century wooden panels in the Tudor Suite).

Rooms are kitted out with complimentary Nespresso machines, bathrooms in Carrara marble, free Wi-Fi, and Bang & Olufsen entertainment systems. Our pick? The Dome Suite- with its DJ booth and terrace overlooking Piccadilly Circus.

To celebrate these six signature suites, the Café Royal has rolled out a special introductory offer, available until March 31, 2014. When you book a stay in one of the six historic suites, you get: an introductory rate of up to 50 percent off; personal Butler service; an airport transfer in a chauffeur driven E Class Mercedes; a complimentary spa treatment and access to the Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre; a bottle of Champagne in-room; traditional English breakfast for two; and late checkout at 4 p.m. (subject to availability). For more information, visit www.hotelcaferoyal.com.

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