Our Review of The Clark Museum: What to See Now, This Fall and Winter

 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890), A Wheatfield, with Cypresses, 1889. Oil on canvas, 72.1 x 90.9 cm. The National Gallery, London, bought Courtauld Fund, 1923 Image © The National Gallery, London 2014
 Vincent van Gogh (Dutch, 1853–1890), A Wheatfield, with Cypresses, 1889. Oil on canvas, 72.1 x 90.9 cm. The National Gallery, London, bought Courtauld Fund, 1923 Image © The National Gallery, London 2014

Luxury Travel Advisor recently visited The Clark museum in Williamstown, MA. Currently, the museum is hosting an exhibit titled “Van Gogh and Nature.” The exhibit runs until September 13 and is well worth a visit. Included in the collection are paintings from all the important periods in Van Gogh’s life, including works from his time in Holland, Provence, Paris, Arles, Auvers and Saint-Remy. The exhibit hosts some of Van Gogh’s most famous creations, including “A Wheat Field with Cypresses” and “The Sower.” If you do decide to visit soon (the museum is open on Labor Day from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m.) plan on there to be crowds admiring the exhibit.

James McNeill Whistler (American, active in England and France, 1834–1903), Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother), 1871. Oil on canvas, 56 4/5 x 64 in. (144.3 x 162.5 cm). Musée d'Orsay, Paris © RMNGrand Palais / Art Resource, NY (photo: Jean-Gilles Berizzi)
James McNeill Whistler (American, active in England and France, 1834–1903), Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist's Mother), 1871. Oil on canvas, 56 4/5 x 64 in. (144.3 x 162.5 cm). Musée d'Orsay, Paris © RMNGrand Palais / Art Resource, NY (photo: Jean-Gilles Berizzi)

After the Van Gogh exhibit make sure to check out the “Whistler’s Mother: Gray, Back and White” collection. On view until September 27, this exhibit focuses on prints and drawings by James McNeill Whistler. This collection’s main piece is, of course, Whistler’s most famous work, informally known as Whistler’s Mother. 

True to its natural setting, The Clark also has an array of hiking trails. We chose the less popular Stone Bench Trail, which will take visitors into the woods on a winding path. We suggest slipping on some sneakers before starting, but we did the whole trail in ballet flats (whew). The Stone bench Trail does lead to a massive stone bench that looks out on a sundrenched meadow (the perfect resting spot). Continue through the meadow (just follow the markers) to connect with the pasture and the amazing overlook. From the overlook you can see most of the valley and Williams College. Traveling to this region in early October? This would be a great place to view the leaf change.  

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Hiking atop Stone Hill. Photo: P. Guillotte
Hiking atop Stone Hill. Photo: P. Guillotte 

Don’t Miss This: On the overlook sits a sculpture — Thomas Schutte’s “Crystal.” Schutte, from Germany, is best known for his large-scale sculptures and figures. This is his first full-scale architectural artwork in the United States, and visitors can get close up, stepping inside the beautifully made structure. You can see this piece until December 31. 

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