Wequassett, Cape Cod

 

The Round Cove Suite, Wequassett
The Round Cove Suite, Wequassett’s top accommodation, has views of its namesake.

 

 

Cape Cod is known as a playground for the affluent. So when you are the only Four-Diamond property on the Cape, you must be doing something right. That’s exactly the case with Wequassett Resort and Golf Club, which, with 120 rooms, recently wrapped a $40 million renovation. Do we hear a fifth diamond?

The top pick here is the Round Cove Suite, part of the resort’s Signature Collection of rooms, joining the Junior Suites and Water Side rooms. The Round Cove Suite can be reserved in a one-, two- or three-bedroom configuration and has such features as gas fireplaces and an expansive deck with bay views. Top Touch: The master bath has an oversized Jacuzzi angled such that guests can take in the bedroom’s fireplace.

On our summer visit, we stayed in No. 246, a Signature Water Side with views of Pleasant Bay from the private deck. Inside, the room has a quaint shabby chic look, complete with a four-poster bed and a pastel color scheme. But don’t let the rustic feel fool you: the entire room has all the latest in tech touches, including a touch-screen panel on the wall that controls the entire room, from temperature and lighting to fireplace settings. The bathroom is perfect for couples that can’t stand a moment apart: shutters separate the soaking tub from a view of the main living area. Note: Speaking of romantics, we recommend one of 32 Cottage-style rooms, which have water views and expansive deck areas.

As impressive as accommodations are, it’s Wequassett’s signature restaurant twenty-eight Atlantic that is the showstopper. The food from Chef Bill Brodsky is befitting of a restaurant with a Four-Star designation, serving dishes that are rife with native and seasonal ingredients. For appetizers, we had the trio of tartare (yellow-fin tuna, gingered hamachi, truffled salmon) and the heirloom tomato salad. Both were a wonderful setup to the crescendo: caramelized day boat scallops with mushroom ravioli and truffle cream sauce. There may be better scallop dishes out there; we haven’t had it yet. Hint: Make sure to contact Resort Manager Anthony Guthrie ([email protected]) and request a table adjacent to the eight-foot window frame that has vistas of Pleasant Bay. The sunset views from this vantage point are an amazing beginning or cap to a meal.

While there is little reason to leave Wequassett’s grounds (we hear stars such as Harry Connick, Jr. and Salma Hayek checked in and stayed), we implore you to do two things: arrange to have the hotel take you via speed boat to Nauset Beach and check out the rest of the Cape. For the former, the hotel offers complimentary boat service to this quiet beach, and can arrange a picnic lunch. While the hotel has a fleet of BMW SUVs to take guests into the town of Chatham, we say take a daytrip to Provincetown on the tip of the Cape. Dine at the famous Lobster Pot, then stroll Commercial Street, which has an assortment of name-brand stores (think Marc Jacobs) and more local shops—stop into Marine Specialties for hard-to-find military knickknacks.
Back at Wequassett, we’d be remiss not to mention the resort’s newly designed Children’s Center, which is not your run-of-the-mill kiddy playpen. It’s replete with a 135-inch HD screen for video-game playing, while, outside, there is a nautical-themed play area. 

Getting There: Fly clients into Barnstable Municipal Airport, which is a 20-minute drive from the resort (Boston’s Logan Airport is 90 minutes from Wequassett). Private jets can be accommodated at Chatham Airport, only five minutes away. 

Luxury travel advisors can contact Director of Sales and Marketing Andy Ross ([email protected]) with questions.

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