David Beckham Teams up with Las Vegas Sands

Macau - SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Getty Images Plus/ Getty Images
Macau - SeanPavonePhoto/iStock/Getty Images Plus/ Getty Images

Marina Bay Sands

David Beckham knows a thing or two about luxury hotels. (While playing for Paris Saint Germain, he resided at Le Bristol for the soccer season.) And now he’s putting all that practice into action. Beckham recently signed a deal with Las Vegas Sands, the international resort corporation, to develop a partnership.

Beckham Ventures will be helping to develop dining, retail and leisure concepts at resorts in Macau and Singapore, including the epic Marina Bay Sands, which was the world’s most expensive casino hotel when it opened in 2010. Pictured here, the hotel is billed as “Asia’s ultimate resort experience,” and has a sky-high infinity pool, restaurants by celebrity chef Guy Savoy, and the SkyPark set on top of the world's largest public cantilevered platform.

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Las Vegas Sands operates The Venetian and The Palazzo in Las Vegas, but Beckham’s attention will be focused on other parts of the world. In fact, Macau is the world’s gambling capital, far surpassing the revenues of the Vegas Strip.

In the official statement, Beckham said, “I am very excited to be working with them [Las Vegas Sands] to develop a range of new business ideas in a part of the world that I love spending time in and is full of optimism and growth.”

Marina Bay Sands

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