Japan Earthquake Causes Shangri-La Tokyo Shutdown

Not the best news out of Tokyo: Less than a month after the Shangri-La Tokyo opened, it will now close down until the end of April due to the Japan earthquake.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the hotel's general manager, Wolfgang Krueger, and about 11 other people from the hotel are now working out of Fukuoka, in southern Japan. "This is not a decision we have made lightly," said Maria Kuhn, a spokesperson for the hotel. "As soon as we feel it is safe and we can run the hotel at our normal standards, we will open again."

Here is the official statement fromt he hotel's website:

Following the natural disasters in Japan on 11 March 2011 and the resulting logistical difficulties and hazards Shangri-La Hotel, Tokyo will not be accepting any new guests until further notice. Bookings will resume as soon as the energy supply and normal hotel operation can and has been restored.

Other luxury hotels in Tokyo have also been affected. Here is the statement from The Mandarin Oriental:

Following the devastating earthquake and tsunami in Japan on March 11, Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo has provided a safe and fully intact environment for guests and employees. The hotel has been able to keep most of its facilities operational, including guest rooms, the spa and fitness centre, as well as the all day dining restaurant and lounge.

In light of the stabilization of the city's power supply and product supply chain, Mandarin Oriental, Tokyo will re-open all temporarily closed hotel facilities effective Saturday, March 26. The hotel will also continue to implement a variety of appropriate measures to support the government's directive to conserve energy.

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