New Details on Rosewood at Baha Mar, The Bahamas

Aerial view of the Bahamas
Bahamas // Photo by shalamov/iStock/Getty Images Plus/Getty Images

Rosewood at Baha Mar

We’ve been excitedly anticipating the December opening of Rosewood at Baha Mar (it made the cut for our New Luxury Hotel Preview 2014). As reported by editor Joe Pike, our Caribbean expert, Baha Mar is a mega resort on Nassau, The Bahamas that will have a beachfront casino and Jack Nicklaus-designed golf course, and offer 2,200 hotel rooms spread across four major hotel brands, including Rosewood, SLS, Hyatt, and The Baha Mar Casino & Hotel.

http://www.rosewoodhotels.com/en/baha-mar

Free Luxury Travel Newsletter

Like this story? Subscribe to The Dossier

Luxury Travel Advisor’s only newsletter, covering unique destinations and product news for affluent travelers. Delivered every Tuesday & Thursday.

Set on Cable Beach, Rosewood at Baha Mar was newly built with British Colonial style architecture and decorated with Bahamian artwork. There will be 200 guest rooms, and even the smallest room category (Deluxe) is a spacious, residential-style apartment (485 to 585 square feet) with furnished outdoor balconies. The décor is contemporary and refined, and the luxurious amenities include Pratesi linens and Nespresso machines. Suites come with kitchens.

The facilities will include the Sense Spa, a 24-hour fitness center, a salon & barbershop, a pool with cabanas, and an array of dining venues. This being Rosewood, expect top-notch service including butlers, beach service, and the Rose Buds Children's Program. For more information, visit www.rosewoodhotels.com/en/baha-mar

http://www.rosewoodhotels.com/en/baha-mar

Suggested Articles:

We spoke with Belmond Cadogan Hotel's new general manager about the hotel's reopening and the challenges presented by COVID-19. Read more here.

Preferred added 13 new member hotels from May through August, bringing the yearly total of new additions to 39. Here are some of the highlights.

The weekly coronavirus cases in Europe are rising faster now than they were during the pandemic’s peak in March, says the World Health Organization.