Hong Kong's First High-Speed Railway Is Now Open

Courtesy of MTR

The Guangzhou-Shenzhen-Hong Kong High-Speed Rail is now open. It became Hong Kong’s first high-speed railway.

The Hong Kong Tourism Board says this bullet train gives people the chance to travel quickly and conveniently between Hong Kong and a few cities across Mainland China. The new infrastructure connects Hong Kong by high-speed rail to nine neighboring cities in the Guangdong Province in South China. The start of this rail could potentially boost tourism in the Greater Bay Area consisting of Hong Kong, Macao and South China.

The over-15-mile rail connects travelers from Hong Kong to more than 40 destinations in Mainland China without changing trains. It connects Hong Kong to Shenzhen and Guangzhou in roughly 45 minutes.

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The Hong Kong section of the rail network goes from West Kowloon Station, which has earned several design awards, including one at the World Architecture Festival Awards, known as the “Oscars of architecture.” Travelers can also see views of Victoria Harbour by strolling along the Sky Corridor on the station’s rooftop.

Outside the station is the West Kowloon Cultural District: A new arts and cultural center. This provides the opportunity for high-speed rail travelers to see exhibitions, performances and cultural events the moment they get out of the High-Speed Rail network.

Tickets for the High-Speed Rail network are available online, from ticket agents and through a tele-ticketing hotline.

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