London Buzz: Picasso, Politics and Play

As the weather warms up for spring, London’s museums and galleries heat up too. From Picasso and politics, to an imaginative sculpture installation and Nordic play for kids, here’s our picks to inspire your culture to-do list, and suggestions for nourishment nearby.

Picasso 1932—Love, Fame, Tragedy at Tate Modern

A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see works from Picasso’s "year of wonders," shown together for the first time in 85 years. 1932 was an extraordinary year for the 50-year-old Picasso: In only five days in March he had completed three exceptional works: Nude, Green Leaves and Bust, Nude in a Black Armchair and The Mirror, which we now know are all portraits of his lover, Marie-Thérèse Walter. Through exceptional private loans, they are reunited here for the very first time since the year they were painted. Altogether, more than 100 paintings, sculptures and works on paper have been brought together from private and international collections to create an unprecedented exhibition of what is considered his most prolific year. Picasso 1932 is available until September 9.

Eat: Walk to Borough Market, London’s oldest food market is still the most vibrant and delicious with everything from vegan burgers to paella.

Free Luxury Travel Newsletter

Like this story? Subscribe to The Dossier

Luxury Travel Advisor’s only newsletter, covering unique destinations and product news for affluent travelers. Delivered every Tuesday & Thursday.

Life With the Kennedys: Photographs by Mark Shaw at Proud Galleries

Reminisce America’s Camelot, an exhibition of historic photographs of the Kennedy family by noted LIFE photojournalist and film-maker Mark Shaw. A visual chronicle the golden years of the Kennedy family as John F. Kennedy progressed from the role of senator to his early presidency. The exhibition marks the 55th anniversary of JFK’s harrowing assassination, shining a new light onto America’s most loved First Family before the tragic events that followed. Life With the Kennedys is open until May 6.

Eat: Rules, a London classic (and actually the oldest restaurant in town), offers traditional fare of game, meat and pies in a rich, red and mahogany setting.

From Hope to Nope at The Design Museum

Fascinating and particularly timely, the Design Museum explores how graphic messages have challenged, altered and influenced key political moments over the past decade. Journey through Occupy Wall Street, Hong Kong's Umbrella Revolution and the streets of Sao Paulo, Brazil and, of course, the elections of Presidents Barrack Obama and Donald Trump. Explore over 160 objects and installations, and uncover the real-time social media conversation around political leaders, through dynamic displays created in partnership with leading social listening platform, Pulsar. From Hope to Nope is on from March 28 to August 12.

Eat: Chic Italian newcomer Enoteca Rosso is a Milan-style wine bar serving only Italian wines, delicious charcuterie imported from Italy and homemade regional pastas.

Anthea Hamilton, The Squash at Tate Britian

One of four artists nominated for the 2016 Turner Prize, Anthea Hamilton has transformed the Duveen Galleries—the entire length of the floor has been recast in white tiles with tiled structures holding sculptures from Tate's collection—creating a giant stage for a solo performer, The Squash. Every morning, the performer selects an outfit, designed in collaboration with luxe Spanish fashion brand LOEWE, each inspired by different kinds of squashes or pumpkins. That’s right: A person dressed as a giant squash plays around the sculptures. Outlandish and captivating, Time Out London has given the show five stars; open until October 7.

Eat: There’s not much right by the museum, but walk a mile and you’re at the new Nova Food complex where there’s 18 restaurants to choose from, our top pick is Danish import Sticks-n-Sushi.

Century of the Child: Nordic Design for Children 1900 to Today at the V&A Museum of Childhood

With interactive exhibits and a storytelling hut to finish, the Century of the Child exhibition brings iconic Nordic designs for children to life. Think: BRIO, LEGO and Marimekko. Created in conjunction with help from Museum Vandalorum, Sweden, Designmuseum Danmark and Design Museum Helsinki, the exhibit is based on a successful program of the same name staged at MOMA in 2012. It's open from March 30 to September 2.

Eat: It’s a bit of a walk, but kids love Cereal Killer Cafe on Brick Lane, serving a menu of boxed cereal from around the world with a variety of milks, plus hot drinks, milkshakes and, importantly, cocktails, a necessary for dealing with sugared-up kids.

Related Articles

Soho House & Co to Open White City House in London

London Theater: Where to Eat in the West End

Corinthia Hotel London Partners With Michelin-Starred Chef Tom Kerridge

Dukes London Celebrates Royal Wedding With Themed Package

Suggested Articles:

With the virus outbreak, tourism has nosedived with cancellations of tens of thousands of flights. Here's what it could mean for the summer games.

The U.S. State Department warns that travelers should not rely on repatriation flights as an option for U.S. citizens under risk of quarantine.

All retreats include twice-daily yoga sessions, daily spa treatments and specially designed healthy “yogic menus” for breakfast, lunch and dinner.